Green Real Estate – Characteristics of Green Real Estate

The face of the real estate industry has changed over the fast few years. These changes are primarily due to the changing preferences of home buyers. Today, it is very common to see advertisements from real estate agents and brokers highlighting that homes on their lists are classified as eco-friendly or environmental friendly. Sounds good…

The face of the real estate industry has changed over the fast few years. These changes are primarily due to the changing preferences of home buyers. Today, it is very common to see advertisements from real estate agents and brokers highlighting that homes on their lists are classified as eco-friendly or environmental friendly. Sounds good because you could be helping the environment but what are the characteristics of green real estate that you should look for when you are buying your own house.

Insulations are made from recycled materials

Home insulation is necessary because it affects the hotness and coldness of home's interior on given times of the day. Insulations have gone far from bearing the color of pink because they have learned to be greener or eco-friendlier. Common house insulations made from recycled materials include old shredded denims, hemp, and cotton. These materials are known to have reduced noise. They also have sealing capabilities. A top-notch choice among green home buyers is insulation made from icynene – derived from used castor oil. It forms spongy-cake substance which can reduce a home's energy bill to as much as 50%.

Furniture close to nature

When buying a green home, you should also consider the furniture that composes the home's interior. From tables, chairs, cabinets, shelves, and other fixtures – you should ensure that they are made from sustainable materials. For instance, there are tables made from FSC-certified bamboos and reclaimed teak. Consider the space-saving values ​​of chairs. There are types that can be folded and stored flat when not in use. There are also cabinets and shelves made from corks or the renewable barks of common hardwood trees.

Availability of solar water heater

Water heater is a great necessity in American homes. However, it contributes to a higher energy bill when in regular operation. Green real estate homes have found a comfortable solution to this need with the installation of solar water heaters. With this feature preinstalled in the home you are going to buy, you do not have to be afraid of paying high energy bill. Solar water heaters utilize the heat of the sun to kill the coldness of the water in shower rooms, bathrooms, and bath tubs. Solar energy-operated water heaters have shelf lives of about 15 years.

Water-saving bathroom, toilet, and kitchen fixtures

There are many plumbing products and fixtures like faucets, toilet bowls, and shower heads that claim they are water-savers. However, it is difficult to prove such claims until you have used them. Some of them were just mere advertisements of the relevant manufacturers but the fixtures are actually water-wasters. To be sure that the house you are going to buy is true to its sense of being eco-friendly, look for the WaterSense label on them. The label is an assurance from the EPA that the products will help you save billions gallons of water during the lifetime of the fixture.

If the house you are going to buy has these features, then it is a certified green real estate home. The house will not only offer comfortable living and convenience but it will also be one that is a contributor to help save the environment and its resources.

Gas Stinks – Why Homes Of The Future Will Be All Electric

Natural Gas is an affordable way to get your BTU's and it is a “relatively” clean burning fuel. That's why so many people use it for heating, cooking, water heating and clothes drying. For all it's benefits, I do not think that gas is going to be the next big thing. Even though we are…

Natural Gas is an affordable way to get your BTU's and it is a “relatively” clean burning fuel. That's why so many people use it for heating, cooking, water heating and clothes drying.

For all it's benefits, I do not think that gas is going to be the next big thing. Even though we are fracking away, which is a problem in and of itself, I think that gas is a gonner.

Today, 75% of the energy to fuel homes is created by burning fossil fuels. It's delivered to our homes in the form of electricity and natural gas or oil. Burning fossil fuels contributor to climate change and is not a long term sustainable solution. So where does that leave us? Nuclear and renewables. Nuclear has issues, see fukushima. Renewables are the only thing left that makes any sense.

The good news is that renewables are part of the no-brainer solution to climate change and adding renewable energy to homes is happening now at a rate faster than most predicted.

If we all had power generation stations on our homes electricity would be the clean solution for our climate. Curiously, it is currently one of the dirtiest solutions because most electricity is created using coal, but if we added a photovoltaic or wind power generation to our homes the mix of power would change and electricity would become a good option.

Here's my prediction: Homes of the future will be all electric.

It's going to be the law of the land that homes will have to be more energy efficient. Remember when we did not have air bags in cars, that's kind of where we are now with homes. We have the technology to build a lot better today, but no one says we need to, so it is business as usual.

The 2012 International Energy Code has started to ramp up the required efficiency of buildings, by increasing the airtightness and insulation requirements for homes. Each succeedive version of the code will increase the energy efficiency of buildings.

Tight, Well Insulated Houses

As homes get tighter and more comfortable, it will take significantly less energy to heat a space and keep it comfortable. It certainly will take some energy, but only a sip instead of a gulp. Gas and Oil have been the go to sources for heat because it is more affordable. With lower demand, the financial incentives for adding gas and / or oil to our homes will not be as large.

Combustion Appliances

In a tight house, combustion appliances that burn fuel can add pollutants like carbon monoxide to the air. The reason it's a problem in a tight house is because the pressures inside the house are less likely to be diffused through leaks. In a leaky house, a bathroom vent is not a big deal. In a tight house, it can cause negative pressure and hinder the natural draft from a combustion appliance. This leads to something called backdrafting and can dump or spill bad things like carbon monoxide into your home. Since Carbon monoxide can kill you, this really is not a good thing.

It is possible to design a tight home with sealed combustion appliances, but because there is no guarantee that appliances will always operate flawlessly and unfortunately, architects and designers will be thinking twice about including them in a home.

Cooking

Cooking is probably the largest reason people love gas. Gas is much more responsive than a traditional electric stove. Guess what, there is induction cooking that is the darling of chefs because it cooks quickly and is very responsive. Induction stoves are expensive, but the flip side is that they are very inexpensive to operate. The only catch is that you must use steel or stainless steel pans, if you can stick a magnet to it you can use it.

Drying Clothes

There are electric dryers, gas dryers, condensing dryers and clothes lines. The alternatives to a gas dryer are electric and condensing dryers. Condensing dryers make the most sense in a high performance home, because they are ventless and do not have a handy path to the outdoors that heat and cold can travel through. They get a bad rap from some clothes can come out wrinkly. An electric dryer that is not located in the building envelope and supplemented with a clothes line is another alternative.

Water Heating

The power of the sun can be harnessed to heat water directly or to create electricity to run an efficient water heater like a heat pump water heater.

Keeping It Simple

Gas needs pipes and electricity needs wires. One system is simpler than two and since electricity can do it all, there is no need for two systems. Simplifying to one system means paying one bill instead of two bills every month.

Renewable Energy

When energy demands reduce it makes sense to think about renewable energy. Renewables are becoming increasingly affordable, but they are still a large expense. It's a lot less expensive to add 2kW to your home than 10kW.

Net-Zero Energy

An all electric house can be a net-zero energy house, one that makes as much (or more) energy as it uses over the course of the year. Theoretically, you could still have gas and be net-zero energy by making enough electricity to compensate for the gas use. It would not benefit you financially though, so where's the incentive? Admit it, we are much more likely to go net-zero if we see the financial sense in it.

Electric Cars

Electric cars are not yet our go to vehicles, but I think they will be. One idea of ​​the future “smart” grid is that we will use our electric cars as battery storage for the grid, modulating the highs and lows and providing a more stable energy flow. An electric house with PV on the roof and an electric car in the garage is a nice loop. Charge the car at night with excess cheap energy from the grid, plug the car in during the day when at work and add a little to the grid when needed and use a little when not needed.

Electric houses were predicted to be the wave of the future in the 30's for very different reasons. Then, it had to do with all the newventions that were headed our way. We were all going to be living like the Jetsons. Now, more than ever we want to simplify and maybe live more like people did in the 30's.

We have all this great technology that enables us to build comfortable homes that make as much energy as we use and we can do it all with electricity. No need for dual systems, no need for the complications. It's going to be easier, smarter and cleaner to just make it electric.

How to Find Green Homes for Sale

If you are after an energy-efficient, sustainable lifestyle, and tremendous functionality that meet great visual appeal, then you better look for a green home that suits not only your budget but also your preferences. Periodically, new models are being developed and constructed. However, because the demand is still not that high and their selling prices…

If you are after an energy-efficient, sustainable lifestyle, and tremendous functionality that meet great visual appeal, then you better look for a green home that suits not only your budget but also your preferences. Periodically, new models are being developed and constructed. However, because the demand is still not that high and their selling prices are a bit expensive than standard houses, finding the right one might be a little difficult.

The Good Life With Homework

The world’s cities are becoming more crowded and city life is becoming an unsustainable rat race. A less complicated and healthier lifestyle can be found living in rural and regional areas if you know how to find a suitable country property.

The world’s cities are becoming more crowded and city life is becoming an unsustainable rat race. A less complicated and healthier lifestyle can be found living in rural and regional areas if you know how to find a suitable country property.

Environmentally Friendly Homes – What to Look For When Investing in Green Property

It is not enough that you know you want to dwell in an eco-friendly house. It is not enough that you settle on the first house you see that is up for sale and available for occupancy. Not all homes are the same. Even when they are tagged environment-friendly, the tag alone does not mean…

It is not enough that you know you want to dwell in an eco-friendly house. It is not enough that you settle on the first house you see that is up for sale and available for occupancy. Not all homes are the same. Even when they are tagged environment-friendly, the tag alone does not mean that you are about to get the benefits you want. Here are some common factors that you should look for when investing your money in a home that is both eco and family-friendly.

Use of recycled material s

Green homes are not that plentiful yet. Although builders are slowly catching on the demand, years are still to be counted before they become mainstream. As such, one of the things you could look for when scouting for that eco-friendly home of your choice is by looking at the construction materials used. If your eyes are not that keen on differentiating recycled or salvaged from new materials, you might ask the seller on the forms of materials used in the construction. If you are lucky, you can find a fitting choice that might have utilized recycled steel and wall panels. The insulation might be old clothes like used denims. Or better yet, there are fabricated construction materials that make use of more recycled materials than the raw ingredients making them more eco-friendly than their other counterparts.

Advantageous use of the natural environment

Developers are now growing wise with the erection of new construction homes by using the natural environment where they are built. Look for homes that have grabbed the advantageous use of the natural setting. The windows should be built where natural light from the outside environment can adequately enter. This should minimize the use of your lighting fixtures even at the earliest times of the day. Never settle in a house that claims it is eco-friendly when the windows are poorly built trying to resolve the aesthetics only and not the functionalities.

Pre-installed alternative sources of energy

Another factor you should look for when buying an environment-friendly house is associated with the methods being used to lessen the use of commercial electricity. The installation of solar panels and wind turbines may be too costly. Yet, in the long run you are about to reap the return of investment in form of savings on your utility bill.

Investing in an eco-friendly house is typically costlier than standard construction homes. The number of its kind is not that huge as compared to other housing units. But by considering the factors discussed above, you are one step away in purchasing the environment-friendly house of your choice as commensurate to your budget and preferences.

Does Using Green Building Materials Increase the Value of Your Home?

With many ways to make a house eco-friendlier or greener, a lot of potential home buyers are asking whether the use of green building materials can actually increase the value of a home. This article attempts to answer the question by giving you various benefits of using such kind of materials in building a house.…

With many ways to make a house eco-friendlier or greener, a lot of potential home buyers are asking whether the use of green building materials can actually increase the value of a home. This article attempts to answer the question by giving you various benefits of using such kind of materials in building a house. Health benefits About 95% of our times are spent inside the house which means that our indoors should be safer than the setting offered by the outdoors.

A Sustainable Life With a Profit

TIM Adams and Pip Watt live in a sustainably built, energy efficient house that is warm in winter, cool in summer and has no bills all year round. Tim designed their 7-star energy rated home about about 7 hectares (about 17 acres) at Gherang near Geelong in the south eastern part of Australia in the…

TIM Adams and Pip Watt live in a sustainably built, energy efficient house that is warm in winter, cool in summer and has no bills all year round.

Tim designed their 7-star energy rated home about about 7 hectares (about 17 acres) at Gherang near Geelong in the south eastern part of Australia in the state of Victoria. The home is fitted with alternative energy systems plus various heating and cooling techniques to make the building carbon neutral and comfortable.

Tim is the current president of the Victorian Building Designers Association who also runs a sustainable home business business, F2 Design, to produce high performance energy efficient homes. Tim is also an accredited thermal performance assessor for the organization.

He became interested in energy efficiency and sustainable building design after the 1975 world oil shock.

Tim and Pip have designed a home that has its own power, domestic water and waste water treatment systems.

The house has 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and north facing open plan living areas with glazed walls to allow maximum natural light on the floor slab to capitalize on available solar heat.

There are no eaves on Tim and Pip's home.

Tim said the use of eaves needed careful consideration as deep fixed eaves can hinder passive thermal effects if not used intelligently.

The day I visited outside it was around 13 Celsius (about 55 farenheit) while inside the house it was a steady 19.5 C (67 F) and the only footwear needed was socks.

Once Tim and Pip chose to install a solar power grid feed system that they carefully calculated their annual electricity use and came up with an average daily consumption figure of 9.25 kilowatt hours.

They reason that a three kilowatt photovoltaic solar power grid feed system would capture enough sunlight to meet with their usage and produce an excess to sell back into the grid.

The house has a photovoltaic solar power electricity system that consist of a three kilowatt inverter with 18 solar panels of 180 watts each.

Tim said when they installed their solar power system there was a state government 66 cents per kilowatt hour feed-in tariff for alternative power systems so he arranged a 15 year contract on this rate with his power supply company.

“The first three-month electricity bill with the smart meter in place delivered a $ 205 credit, even though the average daily sunshine last summer (2010) was 1.5 hours below average,” Tim said.

The Adams have a normal array of household appliances that includes a kettle, toaster, microwave, espresso coffee maker, oven, an induction cooktop, full size dishwasher, fridge, front load washing machine and assorted entertainment equipment.

The roof's wide V-shape design is an important part of the home's solar power system.

The most northerly facing of the two sections of the roof is angled to position the solar panels for maximum exposure to the sun's daily passage.

The thought behind the roof design is worth further examination as being inverted means people are protected from serious injury as any fall means a slip into the roof's long box gutter, not on to the ground 4 meters below.

Tim designed the roof's single box gutter so it was wide and deep enough to efficiently gather the rainwater needed for domestic use.

Cleaning it is also easier than a conventional gutter as it is wide (Tim calls it his lap pool) and can be easily swept and debris quickly removed.

Tim and Pip have plenty of roof space from three buildings that act as the catchment for their 120,000 liter (26,374 gallon) capacity rainwater tanks.

Warm water for a floor slab heating system comes from 60 solar evacuated tubes mounted on the roof plus back-up from an Italian combustion boiler with a high efficiency heat exchanger.

To allow the internal temperature to be controlled the house faces north and there is no under slab insulation.

Laying the concrete floor slab directly on to earth allows the choice of a cooler slab on hotter days.

To encourage further cooling in warm seasons the house incorporated cross ventilation design principles and employ other devices, such as temperature controlled switches on windows, ceiling fans and an evaporative water feature designed to channel cool air inside.

The home is a 7-star energy rated building due to only the southern side being fitted with double glazed windows.

There is insulation in the walls and ceiling with standard R3.5 rated insulation batts used (R rating in this case means about 160mm (6 inch thick) batts.

The house is essentially a square-shape building with rendered brick main support walls and picture windows otherwise clad with plantation native timber weatherboards.

The yellow stringybark weatherboards that clad the house were produced with innovative radial cut processing and sustainable growing methods to reduce environmental impacts and waste.

Tim explained that the most expensive outlay they had to build their home was for a worm-based black-water treatment sewage system.

This cost $ 10,000 Aus. to install and has an annual $ 300 service fee but they calculated this expense would be offset against the savings they make by owning their own power and water systems.

Tim said he had long wanted to build a sustainable design home to prove his design principles but also show how cost effective it was to build such a house.

“I wanted to be able to build a new house and actually put my money where my mouth is,” Tim said.

“I did this (design) to use as an example.

“You can do this sort of thing (build a sustainable house) without spending a lot of money.”

Alternative Building Materials Like Straw

In this next conversation about alternate materials used to build a home, straw is definitely be a viable option. Straw, an agricultural byproduct, is the dry stalk of cereal plants left over once the grain and chaff have been removed. Aside from producing half of the cereal yield, straw is used for fuel, livestock bedding…

In this next conversation about alternate materials used to build a home, straw is definitely be a viable option. Straw, an agricultural byproduct, is the dry stalk of cereal plants left over once the grain and chaff have been removed. Aside from producing half of the cereal yield, straw is used for fuel, livestock bedding and fodder, as well as basket making and thatching.

Benefits of Having an Eco-Friendly House

Due to pollution which includes dirty smoke emitted from cars, factories, burning garbage, cigarette, and other waste materials, living a healthy lifestyle might not be that easy. Without plants and trees in the surroundings, children in cities easily get sick, and the lifespan of the elderly drastically decreases for the same reason.

Due to pollution which includes dirty smoke emitted from cars, factories, burning garbage, cigarette, and other waste materials, living a healthy lifestyle might not be that easy. Without plants and trees in the surroundings, children in cities easily get sick, and the lifespan of the elderly drastically decreases for the same reason.

Planning Minister Mauled Over Desire To Build On Greenbelt Land

Planning Minister Nick Boles has been mauled by members of the Campaign to Protect Rural England over his plans to begin building on greenbelt land. The Minister stated that if we did not begin to build in rural villages they would begin to resemble “museum exhibits”. However campaigners are blaming the housing crisis on developers…

Planning Minister Nick Boles has been mauled by members of the Campaign to Protect Rural England over his plans to begin building on greenbelt land. The Minister stated that if we did not begin to build in rural villages they would begin to resemble “museum exhibits”. However campaigners are blaming the housing crisis on developers who are simply sitting on 400,000 available building plots in the UK. At the meeting the atmosphere turned angry as campaigners began accusing Mr Boles of not listening to them with his simplistic approach.

The countryside campaigners also accused Mr Boles of being “liar” and a “fool” as he again called for homes to be built on greenfield land. Mr Boles was heckled and many campaigners decided that enough was enough and walked out of the meeting as he told them theta those who lived in rural villages would soon become museum exhibits. Mr Boles claimed that quiet villages needed some noise and younger people to avoid them becoming embalmed or fossil. It was then that the meeting turned ugly with the CPRE members stating that it was developers to blame for the housing crisis and not them. There are over 400,000 building plots in the UK with planning permission already granted on them but no development taking place. However Mr Boles said that the problem was that there was not enough land released in the countryside to develop on. After this several members stormed out accusing the Minister of not listening to them, some said that he was a fool who did not understand planning at all.

This caused Mr Boles to lose his temperating that of the 400,000 plots of land currently with planning identified by the Local Government Association only 126,000 are private developments. The rest of the plots are either currently being built on or belong to housing associations.

Sir Andrew Morton, CPRE President, accused Mr Boles of doing a great deal of herm to the countryside by refusing to admit that in fact brownfield land is better suited to development than greenfield land ever will be. CPRE chief executive Shaun Spiers even went as far as accusing Mr Boles of being a “Russian Tsar” because he feels that he is accepting word from Whitehall that the planning system is working, rather than actually going out to the countryside himself. However the Minister rejected this comment. He indicated that if there were a failure to release land for development then the young people in rural areas would be able to ever afford homes there. He claimed that in certain areas such as Cornwall, Devon, the Yorkshire Dales, Sussex and the Cotswolds, there are some villages which are just inches away from becoming “fossilized”. Holidaymakers and those who have retired are in possession of the houses but the young people of the areas who work on farms and plumbers and gardeners can not afford even the smallest of houses.

Mr Boles claims that instead of the CPRE complaining about the countryside being developed on they should instead identify ordinary fields which are located near roads where development can actually take place and that the councils in these areas need to identify land which would be able to take more houses.

Either way the ongoing criticism is carrying on between the two sides with either willing to back down anytime soon.

Three Common Faults in Breeam Evidence

Breeam is one of the leading assessment methods addressing sustainable buildings. It considers nine sustainability topics and results new buildings for a range of issues. Based on the final score of the building, a certificate will be issues identifying the sustainability level that the building has achieved, ranging from pass to outstanding. To enable the…

Breeam is one of the leading assessment methods addressing sustainable buildings. It considers nine sustainability topics and results new buildings for a range of issues. Based on the final score of the building, a certificate will be issues identifying the sustainability level that the building has achieved, ranging from pass to outstanding.

To enable the assessor to score the building both the design and construction team need to provide evidence to the assessor for each of the topics that will be considered. The assessor will then compare the evidence that has been with the requirement and award a score. It is in the provision of evidence that many mistakes are made. The three most comment faults are:

  1. Gaps in the evidence base
  2. Flood of documents vaguely relevant to the issue
  3. Too many caveats in consultant's reports

Gaps in the evidence base
This is the number one fault in the evidence provided to Breeam assessors. It often comes down to the team member not checking the detail of the requirement. It is easy to remedy: each of the team members need to carefully read the requirement for their issues.

Flood in documents
This fault is in a way related to the previous fault. In attempt to compensate for a lack of evidence the team member submits all the documents that are in his own file that are vaguely related to the issue that is being considered. However, all the irrelevant information has the potential to mask the key elements that are relevant to the issue. It can even be worse than this: various design iterations may be included in the information providing conflicting evidence. The cause again lies in the lack of understanding of the team member and the resolution again is to carefully read the requirement for the issue.

Too many caveats
Consultants need to be careful about their statements in the design reports that issue. They do not always control the implementation of their advice. The Breeam requirements often ask for a specification or similar form of evidence. Where a design team member has been assigned responsibility for a Breeam issue where a specification is required to be submitted in evidence it regularly occurs that a provisional specification is provided. These provisional specifications are full of conditional statements. For example the document may state that if X is installed then the credit is achieved. When this happens the consultant will need to either obtain further evidence that X will indeed be installed or they are not the right person to deal with the issue and therefore they will need the responsibility to a more appropriate person.

As The Seasons Change at Playa Conchal

The change of seasons is a welcome event in one of the world’s last dry tropical rain forests. This is the province of Guanacaste on the northern Pacific coast of Costa Rica.

The change of seasons is a welcome event in one of the world’s last dry tropical rain forests. This is the province of Guanacaste on the northern Pacific coast of Costa Rica.

St Lucia Real Estate Tips: 5 Ways for Green Living on the Caribbean Island

St Lucia's rich biodiversity and natural beauty play a significant role in the island's culture and economy. The island's 2 major industries, tourism and agriculture, both depend on sustainable environmental practices. In 2004 the Pitons were inducted as a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to their outstanding beauty and unique ecology. Environmental awareness is therefore…

St Lucia's rich biodiversity and natural beauty play a significant role in the island's culture and economy. The island's 2 major industries, tourism and agriculture, both depend on sustainable environmental practices. In 2004 the Pitons were inducted as a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to their outstanding beauty and unique ecology. Environmental awareness is therefore a cruel part of life in St Lucia. Every human interaction with nature leaves behind an indelible fingerprint. When building a home in St Lucia you should be vigilant to minimize the impact on the environment. Here are 5 easy ways in which you can do so.

Do not clear land indiscriminately. Before starting construction, consider how your home will affect the tree cover in the area. St Lucia is a heavily vegetated country. The precedent and variety of trees is one of the things which makes the island unique. Save as many mature trees as possible. Incorporate existing foliage into the design and layout of your house. This ensures that the island remains green. Mature trees also add majesty and beauty, while keeping a property cool.

Use renewable energy . Sunlight and wind are two of St Lucia's most abundant natural resources. It is now possible to have one's home completely powered by solar panels and wind turbines. Whether you use wind, solar or a combination of the two depends on the location of your home. For instance, home sites on the island's east coast have a constant Atlantic breeze, and are well placed to utilize wind power. While solar or wind power will increase your construction costs, it will eliminate utility bills in the future. In St Lucia, electricity is the most cost utility and the savings will add up in the long run. Renewable energy also reduces the burning of fossil fuel and helps to keep the air clean while reducing the island's carbon footprint.

Harvest rain water . St Lucia has approximately 2000 mm of annual rainfall. Using drainage systems, it is easy to collect rainwater, which is stored in tanks or underground cisterns. This helps conserve the island's public water supply. It also ensures that you have a backup if there are shortages after a hurricane.

Maximize natural ventilation to minimizeize cooling costs . In St Lucia, air conditioning units are major culprits when it comes to high energy usage. Keeping your house naturally cool will significantly reduce your consumption of electricity. High ceilings, large windows, insulated roofs and cross ventilation are just a few ways in which your house can be designed to remain cool. Many homes in St Lucia are located on elevated hillsides where there is a constant breeze. A well ventilated house can eliminate (or at least greatly reduce) the need for air conditioning. (Along the practical benefits, high ceilings and large windows are great for admiring those amazing St Lucian vistas!)

Grow a kitchen garden. Gardens flourish in St Lucia's rich, volcanic soil and tropical weather. It is common for backyards to be laden with tropical foods such as mangoes, guavas, dasheen or breadfruit. Eat your own organic, delicious fruit, vegetables and herbs grow right in your back yard! Once you've gotten your garden started it's easy to maintain. The priority of backyard gardening helps ensure the island's food security and preserves the indigenous foliage. The rewards are delicious and good for both you and the environment!

These are just a handful of ways to live a nature friendly lifestyle if you have decided to buy St Lucia real estate. The island is loved for its lush, green beauty. Everyone in the country must play their part to maintain this. Cautious real estate development can enhance rather than diminish the island's natural environment. Energy efficiency is also a great investment as it will make your home more appealing to buyers should you ever decide to sell.

Needs For Rain Water Harvesting In Luxury Villas

Natural resources are precious at the same time scarce these days. For this reason, these days most people are laying a lot of stress on conservation. The best place to start this would be at home. Now, builders have realized this fact and home owners prefer going in for eco-friendly homes. This trend is especially…

Natural resources are precious at the same time scarce these days. For this reason, these days most people are laying a lot of stress on conservation. The best place to start this would be at home. Now, builders have realized this fact and home owners prefer going in for eco-friendly homes. This trend is especially prevalent when it comes to independent homes such as luxury villas. Since the world population is going up rapidly it has become all the more important to look at some or the other option like this. However, the best part about these homes is the fact that it would be cost saving at the same time it will help you save on your energy bills as well.

Going Green Is Not So Difficult After All

People, who are worried about the declining status of the earth, are constantly on the lookout for ways with which they can reduce the carbon footprint and the effect that they have on the environment. The main cause for the carbon footprint is the increasing dependence that one has on non-renewable sources of energy. However,…

People, who are worried about the declining status of the earth, are constantly on the lookout for ways with which they can reduce the carbon footprint and the effect that they have on the environment. The main cause for the carbon footprint is the increasing dependence that one has on non-renewable sources of energy. However, to reduce this dependence there are a number of simple steps that one can take, such as driving a hybrid vehicle, using eco friendly electric appliances and recycling and reusing, as much as possible. These steps are simple and have a great effect on the overall improvement of the condition of environment.